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District Rural Development Agency (DRDA)

Introduction

 

District Rural Development Agency (DRDA) has traditionally been the principal organ at the District level to oversee the implementation of the anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry of Rural Development. Created originally for implementation of Integrated Rural Development Programme (IRDP), the DRDAs were subsequently entrusted with a number of programmes, both of the Central and State Governments. Since inception, the administrative costs of the DRDA (District Rural Development Agency) were met by setting aside a part of the allocations for each programme. Of late, the number of programmes had increased and several programmes have been restructured with a view to making them more effective. While an indicative staffing structure was provided to the DRDAs, experience showed that there was no uniformity in the staffing structure. It is in this context that a new centrally sponsored scheme - DRDA Administration - has been introduced from 1st April, 1999 based on the recommendations of an inter-ministerial committee known as Shankar Committee. The new scheme replaces the earlier practice of allocating percentage of programme funds to the administrative costs.

Objective

 

The objective of the scheme of DRDA (District Rural Development Agency) Administration is to strengthen the DRDAs and to make them more professional and effective. Under the scheme, DRDA is visualised as specialised agency capable of managing anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry on the one hand and effectively relate these to the overall efforts of poverty eradication in the district on the other.

Funding

 

The funding pattern of the programme will be in the ratio of 75:25 between the Centre and the States.

Strategy

 

The DRDA will continue to watch over and ensure effective utilisation of the funds intended for anti-poverty programmes. It will need to develop distinctive capabilities for poverty eradication. It will perform tasks which are different from Panchayati Raj Institutions and line departments. The DRDAs would deal only with the anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry of Rural Development. If DRDAs are to be entrusted with programmes of other Ministries or those of the State Governments, it must be ensured that these have a definite anti-poverty focus. In respect of such States where DRDA does not have a separate identity and separate accounts.

 

 

 

Following are the program which are implemented through DRDA:

  National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme - Bihar

  Swarna Jayanti Gram Swarojgar Yojana

  Indira Aawas Yojana

  Credit-cum-Subsidy Scheme for Rural Housing

 

 

 

National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme

 

Bihar has been prepared under the provision of National Rural Employment Guarantee Act, 2005. It guarantees 100 days of employment in a financial year to any rural  household whose adult members are willing to do unskilled manual work. In case of failure to provide job, the labourer will be compensated with unemployment allowance. This scheme has been launched in 23 districts of Bihar Viz Araria, Aurangabad, Bhabhua, Bhojpur, Darbhanga, Gaya, Jamui, Jehanabad, Katihar, Kishangunj, Lakhisarai, Madhubani, Munger, Muzaffarpur, Nalanda, Nawada, Patna, Rohtas, Samastipur, Sheohar, Supaul, Vaishali from 2nd February 2006.

Bihar State Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme 2005 has been launched by the Government of Bihar in 15 districts Viz Arwal, Banka, Buxar, Begusarai, Bhagalpur, East Champaran , Gopalgunj, Khagaria, Madhepura, Saharsa, Saran, Seikhpura, Sitamarhi, Siwan, West Champaran from 2nd February 2006. Bihar State Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme is being implement with state fund and on the same pattern as Bihar Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme 2005. 
 

 

Funding:

National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme - Bihar is a Centrally sponsored programme on a 90:10 cost sharing between Govt. of India and State Govt. The Govt.of  India will bear entire expenditure incurred on unskilled workers and 25% of expenditure on semi skilled/skilled workers and cost of materials. The expenditure incurred on payment of unemployment allowance is to be fully borne by the State Govt. This programme is being implement through P.R.I.s 50% of Total available fund is made available to the Gram Pancahayat 30% to the Panchayat Samiti and 20% to the Zila Parishad

 

 Swarnajayanti Gram Swarojgar Yojna

 

This programme was launched in April,1999 by restructuring IRDP (Integrated Rural Development Programme), and a number of allied programmes such as TRYSEM (Training of Rural Youth for Self Employment), DWCRA (Development of Women & Children in Rural Areas), SITRA (Supply of Improved Toolkits to Rural Artisans), GKY (Ganga Kalyan Yojana) and MWS (Million Wells Schemes). This is a holistic programme covering all aspects of self-employment such as organisation of the poor into Self-Help Groups, training, credit, technology, infrastructure and marketing.

 

Objective:

 

The objective of SGSY is to provide sustainable income to the rural poor. The programme aims at establishing a large number of micro-enterprises in the rural areas, based upon the potential of the rural poor. It is envisaged that every family assisted under SGSY will be brought above the poverty-line with in a period of three years.

 

Scope:

This programme covers families below poverty line in rural areas of the country. Within this target group, special safeguards have been provided by reserving 50% of benefits for SCs/STs, 40% for women and 3% for physically handicapped persons. Subject to the availability of the funds, it is proposed to cover 30% of the rural poor in each block in the next 5 years.

 

Funding:

SGSY is a Centrally Sponsored Scheme and funding is shared by the Central and State Governments in the ratio of 75:25 respectively.

 

Strategy:

SGSY is a Credit-cum-Subsidy programme. It covers all aspects of self-employment, such as organisation of the poor into self-help groups, training, credit technology, infrastructure and marketing. Efforts would be made to involve women members in each self-help group. SGSY lays emphasis on activity clusters. Four-five activities will be identified for each block with the approval of Panchayat Samities. The Gram sabha will authenticate the list of families below the poverty line identified in BPL census. Identification of individual families suitable for each key activity will be made through a participatory process. Closer attention will be paid on skill development of the beneficiaries, known as swarozgaris, and their technology and marketing needs.

 

How to Seek Assistance:

For assistance under the programme, District Rural Development Agencies and Block Development Officers may be contacted.

 

Indira Awas Yojna (IAY)

Indira Awas Yojna (IAY) is the flagship rural housing scheme, which is being implemented by the Government of India with an aim of providing shelter to the poor below poverty line. The Government of India has decided that allocation of funds under IAY (Indira Awas Yojana) will be on the basis of poverty ratio and housing shortage. IAY was firstly launched during 1985-86 as a sub-scheme of RLEGP (Rural Landless Employment Guarantee Programme). This scheme, thereafter, continued as a sub-scheme of JRY (Jawahar Rojgar Yojana) since its launching in April,1989. The Scheme was delinked from JRY and made an independent scheme with effect from 1st January, 1996.

 

Objective:

The objective of the IAY is primarily to help construction/upgradation of dwelling units by members of SC/STs, freed bonded labourers and also other BPL non-SC/ST rural households by providing them a lump sum financial assistance.

 

Scope:

IAY is a beneficiary-oriented programme aimed at providing houses for SC/ST households who are victims of atrocities, households headed by widows/unmarried women and SC/ST households who are below the poverty line. This scheme has been in effect from 1st April, 1999.

 

Funding:

IAY is a Centrally Sponsored Scheme (CSS) funded on cost sharing basis between the Govt. of India and the State in the ratio of 75:25 respectively.

 

Strategy:

Grant of Rs. 25,000/- per unit is provided in the plain areas and Rs. 27,500/- in hilly/difficult areas for the construction of a house. For upgradation of unserviceable kutcha houses into pucca houses, Rs. 12,500/- is provided. Sanitary latrines and chulahs are integral part of the house. In construction/Upgradation of the house, cost effective and environment friendly technologies, materials and designs are encouraged. The household is allotted in the name of a female member of beneficiary household.

 

How to Seek Assistance:

The person concerned should contact the Village Panchayat or Village-Level-Worker or the Block Development Officer or District Rural Development Agency

 

Credit-cum-Subsidy Scheme for Rural Housing (CSRH)

Introduction

There were a large number of households in the rural areas which could not be covered under the IAY, as either they do not fall into the range of eligibility or due to the limits imposed by the available budget. On the other hand due to limited repayment capacity, these rural households cannot take benefit of fully loan based schemes offered by some of the housing finance institutions. The need of this majority can be met through a scheme which is part credit and part subsidy based.

 

Objective

The objective of this scheme for rural housing is to facilitate construction of houses for rural families who have some repayment capacity. The scheme aims at eradicating shelterlessness from the rural area of the country.

 

Scope

The scheme provides shelter to rural families who have not been coveted under IAY and who are desirous of possessing a house. All rural households having annual income up to Rs. 32,000/- are covered under this scheme.

 

Funding

The funds are shared by the Centre and the State in the ratio of 75:25 respectively.

 

Strategy

Rural poor just above the poverty line are entitled to get the benefits of the scheme. A maximum subsidy of Rs. 10,000/- per unit is provided for the construction of a house. Sanitary latrine and smokeless chulha are integral part of the house. Cost effective and environment friendly technologies, materials, designs, etc. are encouraged. Sixty per cent (60%) of the houses are allocated to SC/ST rural poor.

 

How to Seek Assistance

State Governments decide the implementing agency, which may be the State Housing Board, State Housing Corporation, specified scheduled Commercial bank, Housing Finance Institution or the DRDA/ZP. The person desirous of getting benefit of the scheme may approach the implementing agency.

 

DRDA Administration

District Rural Development Agency (DRDA) has traditionally been the principal organ at the District level to oversee the implementation of the anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry of Rural Development. Created originally for implementation of Integrated Rural Development Programme (IRDP), the DRDAs were subsequently entrusted with a number of programmes, both of the Central and State Governments. Since inception, the administrative costs of the DRDA (District Rural Development Agency) were met by setting aside a part of the allocations for each programme. Of late, the number of programmes had increased and several programmes have been restructured with a view to making them more effective. While an indicative staffing structure was provided to the DRDAs, experience showed that there was no uniformity in the staffing structure. It is in this context that a new centrally sponsored scheme - DRDA Administration - has been introduced from 1st April, 1999 based on the recommendations of an inter-ministerial committee known as Shankar Committee. The new scheme replaces the earlier practice of allocating percentage of programme funds to the administrative costs.

 

Objective:

The objective of the scheme of DRDA (District Rural Development Agency) Administration is to strengthen the DRDAs and to make them more professional and effective. Under the scheme, DRDA is visualised as specialised agency capable of managing anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry on the one hand and effectively relate these to the overall efforts of poverty eradication in the district on the other.

 

Funding:

The funding pattern of the programme will be in the ratio of 75:25 between the Centre and the States.

 

Strategy:

The DRDA will continue to watch over and ensure effective utilisation of the funds intended for anti-poverty programmes. It will need to develop distinctive capabilities for poverty eradication. It will perform tasks which are different from Panchayati Raj Institutions and line departments. The DRDAs would deal only with the anti-poverty programmes of the Ministry of Rural Development. If DRDAs are to be entrusted with programmes of other Ministries or those of the State Governments, it must be ensured that these have a definite anti-poverty focus. In respect of such States where DRDA does not have a separate identity and separate accounts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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